Math

Making Word Problems More Engaging, Part Three

Making Word Problems More Engaging, Part Three

This is my last post in the series; Making Word Problems More Engaging. Creating analogies for students to understand addition and subtraction is important. Whether you use Trevon, Bobby, Jada, and Maya, or come up with your own characters is not important. What is important is giving students a complete conceptual understanding of addition and subtraction.… Continue Reading

Do Comics Have a Place in Your Classroom?

One feature of the AIMS Essential Math Units, a series that is targeted for middle school, is the inclusion of comics as a way to show students engaged with some of the activities in a unit. Our hope for the comics was that they would help to make explicit the content knowledge that is the… Continue Reading

Making Word Problems More Engaging, Part Two

Making Word Problems More Engaging, Part Two

Dinnertime is a place stories are told at my house. One of my favorite storytellers is my husband Matt. When he tells a story, you feel like you are there. Stories are memorable, they can take us to another world, and for mathematics, stories bring context to the abstract. Our world is full of exciting… Continue Reading

Making Word Problems More Engaging, Part One

Making Word Problems More Engaging, Part One

As I watched my daughter Bethany do her homework last night I had an Aha Moment. She complains almost every day that she has addition and subtraction homework. Apparently, she does not have her mother’s love of math. (I’m working on that.) Her paper had simple numeric addition and subtraction, and she decided that she… Continue Reading

Teaching Addition and Subtraction, Part Three

Teaching Addition and Subtraction, Part Three

This blog post will be the final in a three-part series on teaching addition and subtraction. Part One talks about the Change Plus/Change Minus, and Part Two talks about Composing/Decomposing. Our last situation is Comparison. After reading Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood, I realized how foundational comparing relations (talking about two sets being more than,… Continue Reading

Teaching Addition and Subtraction, Part Two

Teaching Addition and Subtraction, Part Two

I remember my first experience in a Mathematics Methods Course of a Part/Part Whole Mat. I really liked how the mat could be used for both addition and subtraction. This was the beginning of my pedagogical understanding of composing and decomposing as an addition and subtraction situation. I have already written a series of posts… Continue Reading

Taking Apart and Putting Together Cubes

Taking Apart and Putting Together Cubes

In earlier posts I’ve mentioned Friedrich Froebel and his geometric gifts. The third of his geometric gifts was a box containing eight cubes. Instead of the students simply opening the lid and dumping the cubes on the table, he would have the students place the box with the lid down on the table, slide the… Continue Reading

Teaching Addition and Subtraction, Part One

Teaching Addition and Subtraction, Part One

After writing my last blog post, What’s the Difference?, I thought it would be helpful if I blogged about all the different addition and subtraction situations. This post will talk about one of three addition and subtraction situations: the Change Plus/Change Minus situation. What I find fascinating is how researchers have found that Pre-K children… Continue Reading