Episode 28 | Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Its Role in Teaching

Joining Chris in the studio this week is Paul Reimer, a Sr. Researcher at the AIMS Center working with our Early Mathematics studies. Paul is also a student in the Michigan State University Doctoral Program, studying the effects of teacher beliefs on student learning. We discuss his studies and how they connect with our work here at the AIMS Center.

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A Heart for Professional Learning

Who do you rely on professionally? I could name a long list of people, places, journals, periodicals, podcasts, and websites, but most recently I listened to my colleague Chris Brownell’s recent podcast with Director of Special Education Studies at Fresno Pacific University, Megan Chaney. Megan is doing her doctoral research on teachers dispositions and she… Continue Reading

Which is Bigger?

Which is bigger 5/6 or 7/8? If the answer isn’t popping into your head in seconds, you are not alone. Fractions are one of the most misunderstood concepts among both young and old in mathematics.  They don’t seem to follow the same rules as whole numbers.  Many of us purposely never work with fractions at… Continue Reading

Episode 27 | Professional Noticing Part 3: Deciding

In the studio with David Pearce and Wilma Hashimoto two of the AIMS Center’s Research Associates, and we discuss the third aspect of Professional Noticing: Deciding. We discuss how this aspect takes place in the midst of classroom activity, and how it is dependent upon the two prior aspects of: Attend and Interpret. We end up discussing how this supports the goal of creating a student centered classroom, one in which the learner’s thinking and conceptualization is valued as the starting place for academic learning.

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Change Unknown

Recently, while working with students, we offered up a situation where nineteen counters were placed under a cloth.  Seven of the counters were pulled out and the students were asked how many remained under the cloth. One child extended ten fingers, pulled them back, and then re-extended nine. He pulled back seven fingers, one by… Continue Reading

Intensive Quantity and Extensive Quantity

In discussing coordinating units as a way to understand multiplicative reasoning, it is not always evident that there are differences in multiplicative and additive reasoning. What I want to do is give some examples to help clarify the differences. Multiplication is often presented to children as repeated addition. But there is more. In math classes,… Continue Reading

Children Are Natural Mathematicians

In my last BLOG, I wrote about mathematizing our young children’s worlds. No sooner had I written and submitted my BLOG for posting, that my grandnephew came over to visit. Isaac is 3 years old and very shy, but when he decides to talk, he doesn’t stop. This little guy loves to build and create… Continue Reading