The Power of Words

Many of you might be familiar with the proverb, “A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.”  That seems to be an appropriate statement for young children.  In my last blog I mentioned the critical first 2,000 days of a child’s life and the rate at which the brain is… Continue Reading

Professional Noticing: It’s Hard!

Teaching, in my opinion, is one of the most complex occupations in our society.  As Miriam Sherin puts it in Mathematics Teacher Noticing, “the blooming, buzzing confusion of sensory data that teachers are faced with” can be overwhelming.  Remember back to when you were first learning how to drive. You had to pay attention to… Continue Reading

Episode 10 | Discrepant Events, A Way to Engage the Scientific Mind

After a description of a few demonstrations regarding the nature and behavior of water, each that have a “surprising” finish, we discuss how these sort of surprises constitute “discrepant” events. This then leads to a discussion of the “Why” do these events occur, what are the chemical and physical properties at work. We explore how discrepancies can constitute opportunities to cause “perturbation” or a space in the learner to come to a new understanding. We wander off on a minor tangent that generates, for us, a way to more fully investigate these properties. These perturbative events generate within the learner a state of “cognitive disequilibrium” which can then be capitalized upon by a guiding hand to create new knowledge within the learner. We include som […]

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Multiplication is not Abstract

I am honored to work with dedicated, smart, and caring educators. Carmella Crawford, another AIMS Professional Learning Facilitator, is all of these and I would like to take this opportunity to introduce her to you. Carmella lives in Charleston, West Virginia, and has been an AIMS Facilitator for some time. She has taught all grades,… Continue Reading

How Cooking Helped me Relate to a Child’s Experience in Math

In my last blog I talked about how the research I have been studying focuses on the “mathematics of children” and I claimed that research that articulates “mathematics of children” can provide powerful tools for a teacher. Many of us experienced elementary school a long time ago and this creates a challenge for our teaching.… Continue Reading

Coordinating Units, Part 2

This post continues my September 20, 2016 post, “Coordinating Units: A Brief Introduction”. Last time, I introduced a problem to illustrate the basic differences between additive reasoning and multiplicative reasoning used to solve a problem. I also defined levels of units and what it means to “coordinate units”.  In addition, I said that “in activity”… Continue Reading

A New Vision

As we have launched the Research Division of the AIMS Center for Math and Science Education we have found that there is extensive financial backing for educational research and there are increasing funds for the professional development of our teachers.  Yet, there appears to be a gaping hole in this continuum – the funding for… Continue Reading

Episode 9 | Kindergarten Readiness with Tim Yeager

After stating a rather shocking statistic that indicates the overwhelming majority of five year olds enter Kindergarten “not ready” according to one assessment. Tim talks to us about how two varieties of early learning based on two professors theories on how children learn. After a failure in efforts, these professors stepped back from an effort to, “catch children up,” and began to focus on the idea that children are constantly learning. We discuss what comes out of this research, specifically two varieties of learning in children: Naming, and Observational.

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