Braided Strands of Knowledge Translation

The AIMS Center Research Associates who regularly post on this blog site are challenged to not only read, understand, and translate into practice research related to how children come to acquire knowledge of mathematics—specifically we are presently focused on how children acquire knowledge of number—but also to read and come to know the theoretical underpinnings… Continue Reading

Frontloading

I have facilitated many demonstration “number talks” this year throughout Fresno County.  I even blogged about it earlier this school year.  Talking mathematically in our classrooms is so important that I can’t stop sharing the idea of number talks, even if it is being repeated for some of the teachers that I work alongside.  … Continue Reading

Episode 35 | Teaching in a Classroom Designed for Interaction

Eddie Campos Jr.(@edcamposjr), a staple on the Mathematics Twitter Blogospere (#MTBoS) joins us via Skype this week to discuss how he has transformed his classroom environment. Through the use of vertical and horizontal whiteboard surfaces, rich problems, and visual random grouping; Mr. Campos has completely changed his workplace. He talks with us about the effects… Continue Reading

Believe

In a prior post, I talked about our theme for the year here at the AIMS Center – BELIEVE.  Since that time, I have been given a book published by Compendium Incorporated simply entitled, Believe. Each week we post a new belief statement on our website, I write it on the window in my office,… Continue Reading

My Strategy or Their Strategy?

I have many friends with school age children who know that I work in the field of math education and are always eager to pick my brain on what their children are doing in class during math instruction. Since the implementation of the common core standards, a question I get asked many times is, “Why… Continue Reading

Traveling Practices

Our work as learners, educators, and researchers takes us into spaces where we encounter new ideas, people, and experiences. We may enter schools, classrooms, faculty lounges, community centers, or other places of learning where we hope to better understand the patterns of interaction among individuals we meet. While our attention may be on what we… Continue Reading