Early Math

Playful Learning

The AIMS Center Research Division’s early math team is currently interviewing and videotaping 3 and 4 year olds in order to illustrate the developmental stages in learning to count that researchers have identified. We are specifically interested in collecting video clips that illustrate a child’s path in moving from one stage to the next. We… Continue Reading

The Gift of Mathematics

Earlier this month my colleagues and I had the privilege of attending the National Association for the Education of Young Children Conference in Los Angeles. Professional learning is a wonderful opportunity where one can validate ideas, gain new insights, and network with others in the field. This was my first attendance at a preschool level… Continue Reading

Subitizing, Part 2

In my last blog I mentioned that there are two distinct types of subitizing – perceptual and conceptual. I am fascinated by the subtle differences that students show and what that means about their thinking. Perceptual subitizing is the ability to recognize a number without using other mathematical processes (Clements 1999) and there are four… Continue Reading

Conversation

My work with the AIMS team began last month after 20 years in public education, first as an elementary teacher and later as a mathematics coach. I have spent a lot of hours in TK-12 classrooms, walking alongside teachers as they explored ways to make their classrooms places where authentic mathematics learning could happen. In… Continue Reading

Using Fingers to Build Number Sense

It has been a lot of fun to get back into the classroom during the last few weeks!  The Early Mathematics research associates have been interviewing students (3- and 4-year-olds) to see how they say the number word sequence, how they count objects, and how they subitize.  These were our initial interviews from which we… Continue Reading

The Power of Words

Many of you might be familiar with the proverb, “A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver.”  That seems to be an appropriate statement for young children.  In my last blog I mentioned the critical first 2,000 days of a child’s life and the rate at which the brain is… Continue Reading