Early Math

Meet the Children Where They Are: Episode 2

Narrator: “Last time on Meet the Children Where They Are: Mr. Unnamed nerdy-looking stereotypical math Research Associate (RA) is down in the mud getting ready to do some math with an unsuspecting 5-year-old child named Bob. Can he find Bob’s ZPC without damaging the child for life? Let’s head back to the construction site where… Continue Reading

Mind the Black Box

Here at the AIMS Center, a central focus of our attention is the mathematical thinking of children. It should not be surprising that children do not think like adults. While as adults we agree in theory, our actions consistently seem to contradict this truth. The habitual act of laying our own mathematical thinking onto children… Continue Reading

My New Year’s Resolutions

We just celebrated Christmas and in one week, we will turn the calendar to a new year. Between December 26 and December 31, I will begin mulling over what I declare as my 2017 resolutions. My personal goals have been constant for the past score of years and I can rattle them off like a… Continue Reading

Playful Learning

The AIMS Center Research Division’s early math team is currently interviewing and videotaping 3 and 4 year olds in order to illustrate the developmental stages in learning to count that researchers have identified. We are specifically interested in collecting video clips that illustrate a child’s path in moving from one stage to the next. We… Continue Reading

The Gift of Mathematics

Earlier this month my colleagues and I had the privilege of attending the National Association for the Education of Young Children Conference in Los Angeles. Professional learning is a wonderful opportunity where one can validate ideas, gain new insights, and network with others in the field. This was my first attendance at a preschool level… Continue Reading

Subitizing, Part 2

In my last blog I mentioned that there are two distinct types of subitizing – perceptual and conceptual. I am fascinated by the subtle differences that students show and what that means about their thinking. Perceptual subitizing is the ability to recognize a number without using other mathematical processes (Clements 1999) and there are four… Continue Reading

Conversation

My work with the AIMS team began last month after 20 years in public education, first as an elementary teacher and later as a mathematics coach. I have spent a lot of hours in TK-12 classrooms, walking alongside teachers as they explored ways to make their classrooms places where authentic mathematics learning could happen. In… Continue Reading