AIMS Center

In Their Voices (Part 2)

This is the first in the series of blog posts that was written in conjunction with an early learning professional employed at one of our partnering Head Start preschool programs. Corin Villagomez has been a Head Start teacher for three years and she works with three and four-year-olds in a full-day program. She will be… Continue Reading

Systems Thinking

The members of the Research Division here at AIMS have been reading Humberto Maturana and Fracisco Varela’s book, The Tree of Knowledge: The Biological Roots of Human Understanding. These biologists describe how cognition and understanding emerge and are constructed out of single cellular organisms, and as they are coupled together in multi-cellular entities like humans.… Continue Reading

Not Just a Buzzword

Overloaded with educational buzzwords? Ever hear the newest trendy catchphrase and say, “Oh yeah, that sounds good.” Meanwhile, in the back of your mind, you’re thinking, “What does this even mean?” Here’s one I’ve used: “We need to provide students with rich mathematical experiences.” When we hear this at a conference or in a meeting,… Continue Reading

Put Me in, Coach

Every once in a while, something will happen at work that makes me miss the classroom and the kids that I taught. It’s like a craving at times, but today I feel more like the athlete on the bench that wants a shot at winning the game. Here I am on the sidelines, wanting to… Continue Reading

In Their Voices (Part 1)

In his pivotal work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire described the importance of the human voice in dialogue: Human existence cannot be silent, nor can it be nourished by false words, but only by true words, with which men and women transform the world. To exist, humanly, is to name the world, to change… Continue Reading

The Importance of Spatial Learning

Spatial learning was defined by Harvard educator Howard Gardner in 1983 as one of nine individual “parts of the whole” in his theory of multiple intelligences. His ideas have somewhat fallen out of favor over the years mostly due to misinterpretation of his theory. Teachers have always tended to place each student in one of… Continue Reading

Takeaways from Subtraction part 2: To Take Away or Not to Take Away

In my last blog entry, I described three goals suggested by Dr. Les Steffe which support introducing subtraction as take away. Yet, there is a belief among some math teachers that thinking of subtraction as take away interferes with future mathematical development. They argue that using the words “take away” should be eliminated completely from… Continue Reading