Episode 9 | Kindergarten Readiness with Tim Yeager

After stating a rather shocking statistic that indicates the overwhelming majority of five year olds enter Kindergarten “not ready” according to one assessment. Tim talks to us about how two varieties of early learning based on two professors theories on how children learn. After a failure in efforts, these professors stepped back from an effort to, “catch children up,” and began to focus on the idea that children are constantly learning. We discuss what comes out of this research, specifically two varieties of learning in children: Naming, and Observational.

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Whose Task is This?

As a classroom teacher I worked tirelessly to create tasks, problems and questions that I thought would be good for students. I thought that the tasks I was creating were equal to what the students would be thinking. I am constantly reminded that what I perceive to be the question is not always what the… Continue Reading

A Juggling Act

In previous blog posts we have, in various ways, talked about the commitment of the AIMS Center to a constructivist understanding of how children come to know.  There are several reasons for this choice, but probably the most relevant is that the most significant and extensive research related to how children come to know whole… Continue Reading

I am attending because…

The benefits of being an AIMS Facilitator are many, but when I started I did not know that I would get to know so many amazing educators from around the United States. Paul Agranoff is another one of our AIMS Professional Learning Facilitators and he hails from Minnesota. His teaching career has been spent in… Continue Reading

“Because” is not an answer!

“Auntie E! Because is not an answer!” my 3-year old niece shouted in my ear. We were on a nature walk in the mountains and she had been bombarding me with question after question. “Why are there pine needles on the ground?” “Why is this rock gray?” “Why does Sugar (my dog) like to run… Continue Reading

Knowledge Inspires Interaction

Knowledge implies interaction, and we cannot step out of our domain of interactions, which is closed. We live, therefore, in a domain of subject-dependent knowledge and subject-dependent reality… We literally create the world in which we live by living in it. (Maturana, 1978) One of the most exciting experiences for me is watching someone else… Continue Reading