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A Visit With Leslie P. Steffe, PhD

Thank you, Dr. Steffe, for your volume of work, and for encouraging us to further its use!

Les SteffeDr. Steffe joined the Mathematics Education Department at the University of Georgia in 1967. He and Ernst von Glasersfeld mounted the constructivist research program, known as Interdisciplinary Research on Number [IRON], to counter the regressive behaviorism of the 1970’s that followed the era of Modern Mathematics. IRON launched the constructivist movement of the 1980’s and 1990’s with its emphasis on students’ mathematical thinking and learning and mathematical communication. Dr. Steffe continues to work with researchers who participate in an expanded and progressive constructivist research program in order to maintain it as a major force in mathematics education as well as a counter force to the neo-behaviorism of outcome-based education.

The AIMS Center was pleased to have Dr. Steffe in residence for two days this past October. He guided and encouraged us in our work of translating his research findings for classroom use.

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AIMS is a non-profit organization dedicated to assisting teachers to facilitate the development of a robust mathematical and/or scientific knowledge within their students.

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